Westjet, Canada’s second largest airline, announces temporary layoffs of as many as 1,000 staff as demand for flights dropped off with the sudden introduction of stricter Canadian entry rules to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus

Westjet, Canada’s second largest airline, announced Friday temporary layoffs of as many as 1,000 staff as demand for flights dropped off with the sudden introduction of stricter Canadian entry rules to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus.

The carrier said it will have to cut 230 flights per week in February and March, reducing its capacity by almost one-third, citing “volatile demand” and “instability in the face of continuing travel advisories and restrictions.”

As of Thursday, air travellers have been required to show a negative test for the COVID-19 illness before being allowed to board a to Canada. They must also quarantine for 14 days upon arrival.

“Immediately following

Airlines have been forced to scale back purchases of aircraft by makers such as Airbus as a result of the coronavirus crisis

European plane maker Airbus said Friday that it garnered just 268 net new orders last year, a drop of 65 percent year-on-year reflecting persistent fears about the prospects for air travel amid the coronavirus crisis.

The new orders take into account 115 cancellations as airlines scaled back their ambitions because of uncertainty about how long international travel restrictions will remain in place.

Deliveries of completed Airbus planes also suffered, falling 34 percent to 566 planes last year.

“Based on our 2020 deliveries, we are cautiously optimistic as we look into 2021, although challenges and uncertainties remain high in the short term,” chief executive Guillaume Faury said in a statement.

The company scaled back production at its factories by 40 percent last spring, and Faury said in October that

Facebook hopes to begin making money with WhatsApp by opening it to advertising and sales

The popular messaging app WhatsApp asked its some two billion users on Thursday to accept new terms that will allow it to share more information with its parent company Facebook and roll out advertising and e-commerce.

The update sparked criticism among users as they must accept the changes or see their access to the service—which also allows encrypted voice and video calls—cut off from February 8.

Facebook aims to monetise WhatsApp by allowing businesses to contact their clients via the platform, even sell them products directly using the service as they already do in India.

“Privacy policy and terms updates are common in the industry and we’re providing users with ample notice to review the changes, which go into effect on February 8th,” a Facebook spokesperson said.

“All users need to accept the new terms

Canadian regulators must still reopen the country’s airspace to the 737 MAX following its worldwide grounding in 2019

Canadian airline WestJet said Wednesday it plans to return its passenger fleet of Boeing 737 MAX aircraft to the skies this month, nearly two years ago after their worldwide grounding following two crashes that killed 346 people.

“Our first MAX will be ready to return safely to service as of January 21,” company president Ed Sims said in a statement.

The return to service, however, is conditional on regulators reopening Canadian airspace to the jetliner, a decision expected this month after Boeing addressed and improved on the MAX.

In December, the Canadian government announced that it had validated changes made to the design of the aircraft used by domestic carriers Air Canada, WestJet and Sunwing.

“While we don’t have final confirmation on when (Transport Canada) will open Canadian

Every business—large, small, or micro—struggles, at least occasionally, with the challenge of getting paid on time. While larger businesses can easily survive a few late payments, for small businesses, even one late payment can be the difference between ordering new inventory and having empty shelves.

Six Tips to Get Paid Faster

1. Use a professional design

Appearances count in all aspects of running a business, including your invoices. If your invoices look sloppy and unprofessional, clients won’t take you seriously. Your invoices could quickly end up on the bottom of the pile. With today’s technology, there’s no excuse for this. Look for a clean design with a place for your logo and pertinent information.

2. Use familiar language

What is the first thing clients look for when they receive an invoice? They want to know what they’re being invoiced for. If it’s at all unclear, you can be sure the

Credit: CC0 Public Domain

In 1996, Congress passed the Communications Decency Act, which fueled the rise of the modern internet and technology giants Facebook, Google and Twitter. That law contains a provision that has emerged as one of the nation’s most hotly contested issues.

Section 230 allowed these companies to largely regulate themselves, shielding them from liability for much of the content their users post on their platforms and granting companies legal immunity for good faith efforts to remove content that violates their policies.

The key part of the provision—sometimes called the “26 words that created the internet”—reads, “No provider or user of an interactive computer service shall be treated as the publisher or speaker of any information provided by another information content provider.”

What that boils down to: Individual users can be sued for content they post, but generally the platforms cannot, at least not successfully.

There are exceptions