Customers’ first impression of your brand can make a major impact on whether they choose to buy from you. Making a good first impression requires lots of work. You need to create valuable content on your blog and social media. You need to build a personal brand. And you may even need to learn about new options for starting a business. Check out the tips below from members of the online small business community to help you make a positive impression.



Make a Great First Impression with These Techniques

You only get one chance to make a good first impression on potential customers. So you need to carefully plan what you want customers to take from their initial interaction with your brand. The techniques in this Crowdspring post by Katie Lundin can help your business stand out.

Justify Your Price to Customers

Price is often one of the first

Taking your small business global sounds like a huge undertaking. However, even small businesses can realize the benefits of selling in international markets. This type of expansion can help you increase profits, build sustainable operations, and increase your brand recognition around the globe. To do this, you have to take into account what goes into international marketing.

Expanding internationally isn’t right for every business. It’s important to carefully consider the pros and cons before jumping in. And then you need to learn the steps involved before you dedicate all of your efforts toward managing trade relationships and foreign marketing. If you decide that going global is right for your small business, finding the right tools and guidance is a must. This can help you maximize your international marketing and multinational strategy.

If you’re ready to learn how to take your business global, here are some extra tips to

By Amanda Dodge

There are several indexes used to track the overall health of the economy and help business owners understand the trends they see locally. These relate to consumer trends, the stock market, and employment.

The government also releases data related to employee behavior. The U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics also releases monthly data on the country’s “quit rate,” or the rate at which people voluntarily quit their jobs. The quit rate has historically flown under the radar as Congress and local municipalities alike focus on unemployment numbers as the main barometer of economic health. However, as a small business owner, the quit rate might have more of an impact on your operations – and your employees – than you realize. 

Understanding the Quit Rate

The quit rate refers to employees who leave companies of their own accord as opposed to team members who are laid off or fired.